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Cancer Survival Rate Improved Among Teens and Young Adults

  • March 26, 2013
image A report from Cancer Research UK shows that the cancer mortality rate among teens has dropped by nearly 50% in UK. It is estimated that 2,100 young people aged 15-24 years old are diagnosed with cancer each year in the UK. The number of cancer deaths in this age group fell from 580 per year between 1975 and 1977 to 300 per year between 2008 and 2010. The survival rate among blood cancer patients improved drastically. Researchers report that though there is a remarkable de...
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In East Africa ‘Ethiopian Coffee Ritual Great For Bonding’

  • March 26, 2013
To discuss your problems and find solutions would you fancy bonding over a fragrant dark brew? Head for the Ethiopian Cultural Centre here where the East African nation's traditional coffee ceremony is there for the partaking. It's largely an all-women affair but outside of Ethiopia, men occassionally join it. "In Ethiopia, women do not have enough time. They work for 17 to 18 hours a day. The only time they have to themselves is during the coffee ceremony ...
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Researchers Develop Billboard That Produces Drinking Water from Air

  • March 26, 2013
By producing clean water from the humidity in the air, through filters a billboard outside Lima, Peru provides drinking water to whomever needs it. Researchers at the University of Engineering and Technology (UTEC) in Lima and advertising agency Mayo Peru DraftFCB joined forces to launch the billboard, the BBC reported. UTEC said that they wanted to put "imagination into action" and show that it is possible to solve people's problems through engineering ...
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Inflammatory Diseases: Were They Created By Evolution?

  • March 26, 2013
Researchers demonstrate that some variants in our genes that could put a person at risk for inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease or rheumatoid arthritis, have been the target of natural selection over the course of human history. The new research was published in the April 4, 2013 issue of iThe American Journal of Human Genetics/i. The research team, led by Philip De Jager, MD, PhD, BWH Department of Neurology, looked at genome-wide association ...
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Military Personnel Given Hope for Return to Active Duty By Newer SLAP Tear Surgery

  • March 26, 2013
Research shows that biceps tenodesis surgery is safe and effective for individuals who had previously undergone unsuccessful arthroscopic SLAP (superior labral anterior posterior) tear repairs of the shoulder. The research was presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Specialty Day in Chicago, IL. "Our research focused on a sample of 42 active-duty men and women who were unable to return to duty after primary arthroscopic SLAP repair," ...
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Eyes of Babies To Be Screened for Diseases By Bangalore Hospital

  • March 26, 2013
Super specialty Narayana Nethralaya in this tech hub has screened the eyes of prematurely-born babies for any disease affecting their vision. In doing so they have become the country's first eye hospital to do so. Launched under the state-run National Rural Health Mission, the novel community paediatric eye programme will focus on retinopathy of pre-maturity (RoP), eye care, vision, eye cancer and rehabilitation (Forever) that will complement the central government-sponsored ...
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Multiple ACL Surgery Techniques Effective in Helping Athletes Return to Play: Researchers

  • March 26, 2013
The effectiveness of the single versus double-bundle method of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair were debated by orthopedic surgeons for years. However new data shows both techniques lead to similarly effective outcomes for patients, according to researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Specialty Day in Chicago, IL. "We examined 98 patients who underwent reconstructions to repair ruptured ACLs using ...
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Scientists Working on Building Virtual Human Brain to Explore Mental Disorders

  • March 26, 2013
South African neuroscientist, Henry Markram, is all set to build a digital working model of the human brain. The project named "Blue Brain" has been granted a 12 billion South African rand grant from the European Union and is being created in a supercomputer at the Swiss Federal Institute for Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland. The project is aimed at mapping all 100 billion neurons connected by 100,000 billion synapses of the human brain on a single ...
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Stem Cells from Amniotic Fluid May be Used to Treat Intestinal Disease in Newborn

  • March 26, 2013
The results of a recent stem cell research indicate that stem cells from amniotic fluid could be used to treat a fatal intestinal disease, necrotising enterocolitis, among premature newborns. Dr Paolo De Coppi, from University College London's Institute of Child Health, and team, conducted animal trials. Rats with the intestinal disease were injected with amniotic stem cells. A week later, it was found that rats injected with the stems cells showed increased survival ...
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Obese Horse Riders Put Horses at Risk of Back Pain and Other Behavioral Problems

  • March 26, 2013
Obesity among horse riders has put horses under health risk, warns a study published in the Journal of Veterinary Behaviour. Dr Hayley Randle and team assessed the weight of 152 horses and their riders in Devon and Cornwall. The health of the horses was also assessed. It was found that only 5% of the riders were below 10% the weight of their horse, which is an optimal level to ride the animal. Sixty two percent of the riders weighed 10%-15% ...
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